Last edited by Darn
Sunday, August 9, 2020 | History

8 edition of Venice and its merchant empire found in the catalog.

Venice and its merchant empire

by Kathryn Hinds

  • 79 Want to read
  • 36 Currently reading

Published by Benchmark Books in New York .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Venice (Italy)
    • Subjects:
    • Venice (Italy) -- History -- Juvenile literature,
    • Venice (Italy) -- History

    • About the Edition

      Examines the history, culture, religion, society, and achievements of the Italian city of Venice, from its founding to its surrender to Napoleon at the end of the eighteenth century.

      Edition Notes

      Includes bibliographical references (p. 77) and index.

      StatementKathryn Hinds.
      SeriesCultures of the past
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsDG676 .H54 2002
      The Physical Object
      Pagination79 p. :
      Number of Pages79
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL701867M
      ISBN 100761403051
      LC Control Number97050353

        Venice as Trading Empire. The twelfth century saw Venice and the remainder of the Byzantine Empire engage in a series of trade wars, before the events of the early thirteenth century gave Venice the chance to establish a physical trading empire: Venice had agreed to transport a crusade to the "Holy Land," but this became stuck when the Crusaders couldn’t pay. German merchants brought metals and metal products (including silver). Venetians traded these metals up the Po Valley and in the Mediterranean. In the Fondaco dei Tedeschi was created in Venice to provide for the trading needs and lodging of German merchants. In building up its trade, Venice created a political empire.

        Venice as we know was proud of its republic state, proud to be men that ruled themselves and did not adhere to the ways on land. So the Medici name might not have worked, given their reputation in Florence, when establishing a ‘Banco’ (Banco is the Italian for desk or bench, describing the surface on which the money was dealt on).   Venice, often known as “the floating city,” was founded in the fifth century AD. Built after the fall of the Roman Empire, the city became the merchant capital of the world. Venice is completely surrounded by water. People use boats as the main form of .

        In which John Green discusses the strange and mutually beneficial relationship between a republic, the citystate of Venice, and an Empire, the Ottomans--and. Who was the famous merchant from Venice, Italy ( - ) that visited the court of Kublai Khan? Who was the Islamic author whose book influenced the development of European medicine? The Battle of Tours in modern day _____ stopped the expansion of the Islamic Empire into Europe. France. The _____ is the most sacred book of Islamic.


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Venice and its merchant empire by Kathryn Hinds Download PDF EPUB FB2

Hinds traces the history of Venice from Roman times through the establishment of the republic and empire to its decline as a political power. The heart of the book is the depiction of Venice during the Renaissance: its economic base, social structure, religion, architecture, music, and : Kathryn Hinds.

Venice became home to an extremely wealthy merchant class, who patronized renowned art and architecture along the city's lagoons. Venetian merchants Venice and its merchant empire book influential financiers in Europe. The city was also the birthplace of great European explorers, such as Marco Polo, as well as Baroque composers such as Vivaldi and Benedetto l: Eraclea, (–), Malamocco.

Examines the history, culture, religion, society, and achievements of the Italian city of Venice, from its founding to its surrender to Napoleon at the end of the eighteenth century.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 77) and index Examines the history, culture, religion, society, and achievements of the Italian city of Venice, from its founding to its surrender to Napoleon at the end of the eighteenth centuryPages: Venice - Venice - History: Uniquely among Italy’s chief cities, Venice came into being after the fall of the Roman Empire in the West.

The Lombard hordes, whose incursions into northern Italy began in addrove great numbers of mainlanders onto the islands of the lagoon, previously the homes of itinerant fishermen and salt workers.

The isolated communities, literally islands of Veneto. "City of Fortune: How Venice Ruled the Seas" by Roger Crowley is a fascinating account of the Venetian empire between the years and This book is not a dry recitation of dates, names, and battles.

I found it to be an engaging narrative about a remarkable city and its exploits throughout the Mediterranean/5(). You can write a book review and share your experiences. Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read.

Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them. The same merchant galleys that carried spices, soap, cotton, and industrial supplies from the bazaars of the Islamic Near East to the markets of Venice also brought with them luxurious carpets, velvets, silks, glass, porcelain, gilded bookbindings, illustrated manuscripts, and inlaid metalwork (Mahmud al-Kurdi, Salver, late 15th century; Musée du Louvre, Paris).

Venice and the Mamluks Venice’s economic and diplomatic relationship with Egypt, Syria, and other areas along the eastern Mediterranean shore was tied, in particular, to the Mamluks (–), the powerful Islamic rulers who both halted the advance of Mongols west of Iraq and expelled the last of the Crusaders from the Holy Land in the second half of the thirteenth century.

Venice, city, major seaport, and capital of both the province of Venezia and the region of Veneto, northern Italy. An island city, it was once the center of a maritime republic. It was the greatest seaport in late medieval Europe and the continent’s commercial and cultural link to Asia.

This outraged the City of London and its Puritan merchants, followers of doctrines derived from Calvin of Geneva. With their tirades about their own divine right, the early Stuarts were violating a cardinal point of the Venetian political code. Venice was an oligarchy ruled by, at most, a few thousand male nobles.

Thomas Madden’s majestic, sprawling history of Venice is the first full portrait of the city in English in almost thirty years.

Using long-buried archival material and a wealth of newly translated documents, Madden has weaves a spellbinding story of a place and its people, tracing an arc from the city’s humb/5(). Venice is the player this lively narrative focuses on, specifically during the three centuries, from toin which it was at the apex of its sway over maritime trade.

Marco Polo () was a Venetian merchant believed to have journeyed across Asia at the height of the Mongol Empire. He first set out at age 17 with his. The most important contemporary account of Venice's governance during the time of its flourishing; numerous reprint editions.

Ferraro, Joanne M. Venice: History of the Floating City (Cambridge University Press; ) pages. By a prominent historian of Venice.

The "best book written to date on the Venetian Republic." Library Journal (). Venice had a very pragmatic approach that allowed it to prosper by accepting, within certain limits, merchants from all over the world, even including Turks from the Ottoman Empire. The history of the various maritime republics is quite varied, reflecting their different lifespans.

Venice, Genoa, Noli, and Ragusa had very long lives, with an independence that outlasted the medieval period and continued up to the threshold of the contemporary era, when the Italian and European states were devastated by the Napoleonic republics kept their independence until the.

Free download or read online The Merchant of Venice pdf (ePUB) book. The first edition of the novel was published inand was written by William Shakespeare. The book was published in multiple languages including English, consists of pages and is available in Paperback format.

The main characters of this classics, drama story are. The book has been awarded with, and many others. In other words, the territorial unity of the Ottoman Empire guaranteed protection of the main trade routes across the Red Sea, the Syrian Desert and Anatolia to the Mediterranean coast, thus ensuring Venice continued to trade by sea, followed by its new competitors (the English, Dutch and French) at the end of the 16th Century.

Venice soon became a second-rank power contained and balanced on the Italian mainland and severely weakened in the Mediterranean. The choice to become entangled in Italian politics, rather than the rise of the Ottoman Empire, was the decisive factor in its decline.

“Venice mangled its grand strategy in Italy,” Grygiel concludes. A Rather Long Paper About Medieval and Early Modern Galley Warfare in the Mediterranean Ferrando Bertelli’s Battle of Lepanto () To examine how Venetian seapower grew to become an effective force in the Mediterranean, an examination of how Venice herself came to exist must be understanding how and why the Venetian Arsenal was the leading European .The Merchant of Venice is a play by William Shakespeare believed to have been written between and The Merchant of Venice is one of Shakespeare’s romantic comedies, probably written in andand forms one of a group of such comedies, along with The Two Gentlemen of Verona, As You Like It, and Twelfth Night.important commercial zone and its trade enriched European civilization and its merchants developed the most important premodern mercantile innovations, from maritime insurance widely‐read and debated book of that name, which By the twelfth century, merchants from Venice, Genoa, and Pisa had already established extensive networks of.